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have cast it as a civil right? >> i think that's definitely part of it, and pop culture is a big part of it. as, you know, seeing same-sex couples has become more normal, more mainstream. people are used to see it and more gay couples feel comfortable telling people around them this is who i am, this is my family. that really changes mores. there was already a huge generational gap but now we're seeing major shifts through all generations. for first time white catholics support -- a majority of white catholics support same-sex marriage. >> marco rubio was asked about his views on same-sex marriage. let me play you what he said. here he is. >> is homosexuality a sin? >> i can tell you what faith teaches and the faith teaches it is. as a policymaker, you know, i could just tell you that i'm informed by my faith and my faith informs me in who i am as a person, but not as a way to pass judgment on people. >> okay. so rubio says his faith informs him that its a sin but he's not going to cast judgment on others. he's not going to point the finger, but can rubio fight an election in that fud
in only the way she can. sued by civil rights groups for denying driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants who have been granted permits by the be obama administration to remain the in the united states. the deferred action program allows undocumented immigrants under 31 to avoid deportation if they arrived here before turning 16, have been in the country five straight years and are in school or have graduated from high school or a geds program or served in the military. brewer who has battled the obama administration over her state's immigration policies insists she's obeying laws. >> the state is the one that licenses the people to be able to drive on the streets. it's not the federal government. i'm not surprised i'm being sued, but that's the law and i'm going to obey my oath of office. >> it is worth noting that according to the arizona republic, the state already grants licenses to noncitizens with work permits. brewer seems to be singling out those who have received their permits through the department of homeland security's executive action. translation, jan brewer is pi
, who if they are looking for a civil rights campaign, this is it it. those athletes who are sick and tired of this, i think this is their civil rights campaign. to get guns off the street. >> i'm a sportsman. i have firearms. i hunt deer and pheasants and all that kind of stuff. you want law-abiding citizens to give up their rights to own firearms at this point? that's a fair question. >> it is a fair question. and i take every opportunity to emphasize. i'm glad you asked it again. absolutely not. >> well then you have a law-abiding citizen who happened to be an nfl player who gets a great deal of visibility because of this tragic incident. should he have not been able to own a firearm? >> the 2nd amendment has been decided by the sue -- supreme court. it's within his right to own a firearm. he should have been aware of the risks associated with it. i think there's an education job we need to do there. we need to have an honest conversation about the risks and dangers associated with firearms. and we need to do what we can from a policy perspective to keep the guns out of the han
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
civil rights. but as the tool has become a regular tool of political warfare, scrutiny of the procedure has increased and questions raised about its impact on the chamber. now, reid and other senate democrats want to change the rules to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed to formally begin debate on a bill; and require a "talking filibuster," forcing senators to make their case on the floor for hours and hours, like jimmy stewart did in the 1939 film "mr. smith goes to washington." >> i'm not, and i'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause. >> holman: or former south carolina senator strom thurmond, who spoke for over 24 hours in an attempt to defeat the civil rights act of 1957. but in today's senate, where 60 votes are needed to pass almost any piece of legislation, it means even the threat of a filibuster can gum up the process. democratic leader harry reid says enough is enough. >> we have this crazy idea, mr. president, that if we're going to have a filibuster, you have to stand and say something, not hide in your office someplace or go to a wedding that you're h
on diversity and civil rights. arpaio told the arizona republic he can, quote, get along great with the hispanics. the hispanics? not exactly spreading the love. here's what arpaio said after winning re-election despite an aggressively challenge from a latino activist. >> i would hope to get together with the latino community if i could ever have them talk to me without screaming and threatening me. >> let the charm offenser begin. arpaio's long and ugly history of getting together with the latino community includes a justice department lawsuit accusing him of racial profiling, lawsuits linked to alleged civil rights violations, and the death of a prisoner while in custody. and recently saying he'll arm deputies with automatic weapons so they can hunt down suspected and undocumented immigrants. arpaio says now, quote, i sure would like to meet with latino community leaders, in the backroom or whatever, have a couple of beers and try to explain. meet in the backroom? a couple of beers? does arpaio really think a happy hour can erase his offensive record? not even a nice try, she
of constitutional import like civil rights which we all think of the segregationists leaving the floor book on the floor of the senate to hold the bills up. they were pretty big bills but now every single nomination, whether it's for a judgeship or for the assistant secretary of commerce is filibustered in effect and held up and on average now, it takes 188 days for a judge to be confirmed. you have a judicial emergency all over the country with not enough judges. i'll say i actually think there is an argument to be made that you want more consensus on judicial nominations perhaps than not because they're for lifetime but these everyday appointments, budget bills routine bills this isn't about deliberation, the world's greatest deliberative body. it is about someone finding a tool and using it to gum things up and it is time to change the tool. >> eliot: fascinating counter point about the judicial nomination. i hadn't thought about it that way. congressman, i want to come back to you for the last question, unfortunately.
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
to fight the battle 100 years again with the civil rights movement. good. i think many would make similar claims about world war i and world war ii. if he's trying to make a claim for really van gishing your enemies, that would do it. >> since they took over the house, they've stopped anything from getting done. congress is on track to become the least productive congress since 1947. how much pressure does that put on boehner to make a deal? >> you know, i think it's a really interesting open question, for this reason. they have managed to defy the laws of political gravity in that respect for basically the first four years. their idea is the normal idea of political gravity is that we have to go back to our districts and campaign on something. we have to tell them things that we have done and they have been relatively successful in not obeying that. the question is, does this election change their mind of what their incentives are? >> this is one of the basic rules of american congress, congress vote yes. up don't need to know what the topic or bill is. they tend to move legislation forw
heard nothing, he's a civil rights attorney and democratic strategist, richard, what is fascinating to me, it is your former boss bill clinton who signed the defense of marriage act as between a man and woman only. does he regret his decision? >> he says that he regrets it and now he's a strong proponent for same-sex marriages. >> the supreme court will at least take one of these cases. why do you think the court did not come out with a decision on which case to review? >> well, i think that they probably decided that these are complicated issues, in fact they're quite complicated and quite historic and they probably need a little bit more time. but we expect, i think the big news for next week is we expect either tomorrow, monday morning, but at some point next week, maybe as late as friday afternoon, but at some point next week, we're going to start to hear from the supreme court, which cases they will consider, we feel pretty strongly that they will accept for consideration the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act. and the big matter that may come out of the court nex
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it was the first album to sell a million copies. >> rhythm is an international language. >> reporter: his quartet played for presidents and foreign leaders setting the mood for the historic reagan-gorbachev summit in moscow. >> all these people that almost hated each other were swinging. >> reporter: brubeck also used his music to unite a racially divided america becoming one of the first white jazz musicians to play in all black clubs. >> the more has changed with artists, all kinds of artists, the better this world will be. >> reporter: he devoted his life to that goal. he died in norwalk, connecticut, one day before h
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
was working with the house judiciary committee on getting that civil rights bill through, using the cardinal in philadelphia, using boss dick daley in chicago to try to get some members there. he was working, working, working. it is a job, politics. it's an honor and it's a job. you got to do it, and i think the president would learn from this fellow jack kennedy. as gamerrous as this guy was, he was a worker bee when it comes to politics and i think the more the president spends time with members of congress on the hill, the more liberal as well as the more conservative, the more personal sometime he spends with those people the better shot he has at establishing a working relationship. it's not done by the telephone. you go the to meet, you got to get in the same room together. >> words of wisdom. words from history. chris matthews, as ever. thank you so much. >> you're a great colleague, sir. >> thank you, sir. >>> next, why team romney and republicans still don't get it. stay with us. >> of what has happened to this country when i sing "white christmas" now, i will no doubt be deemed to
texas. he helped write the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act. he didn't care much for president nixon, even saying he would have voted to impeach him the day he was inaugurated but it wouldn't have looked good. he helped draft nixon's articles of impeachment. brooks ran the kennedy presidential campaign in his texas district. he was also there the day he was killed and stood next to lyndon johnson as he was sworn in on air force one. by the way according to "the new york times", one of johnson's aides said brooks was one of the few men johnson was ever afraid of. brooks died at a baptist hospital from a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> well, the president and republicans agree on very little in their fiscal proposals. with one glaring exception. neither proposal specifically includes defense cuts. in fact, both sides have gone out of their way to say they shouldn't happen. but if there's no deal, they may happen anyway. in today's "deep dive" how the sequester could impact our military, our economy, and our safety. the budget control act calls for about a t
that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards. >> that's what the treaty does. it seds down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i kneel happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me the from voting. let's find out how it worked. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are re
states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempt at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can republican party do about it? big questions. j.k. watts former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith brown di an news. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor or rather put it this way against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know if backfired because, numbe
that the civil rights of americans all 300 million of us should be taken away and we should be denied the right to own a gun that would be the only way to take it away from jovan belcher is to say no one can own a gun other than military or police. that's an outrageous suggestion. costas ought to be fired. >> larry it's ridiculous we're talking about firing a guy for trying to start a debate about how to control guns in this country. >> i don't want to talk about -- i want to leave the costas situation alone. he said what he said. what i want to talk about igor is the issue of violating the second amendment or greater gun regulation would have stopped this? i mean the question i have -- look, this guy was a big drinker. he suffered concussions. he use ad lot of pain killers. clearly, clearly he had huge mental and physical problems. how would the gun thing have played out if he couldn't have got end it? >> we don't know about this one case but we do know is in cases of domestic abuse you really do see this correlation that if there's a gun in the house the chances of death resulting from domest
by the president. the group of civil rights organizations has filed suit in response. on health care governor brewer has informed the federal government that it's up to them to set up health exchanges for the state's uninsured. states rights surrendered quite conveniently. we're back with anna marie and jonathan. the arizona republic found over 39,000 licenses and even state i.d.s were issued since 2006 to noncitizens who were presented federally issued employment authorizations. so is this another attempt by brewer to initial young immigrants who find themselves in this country, of course, through no fault of their own or does she just enjoy wagging her finger at the president? >> i don't know why that's a binary choice, martin. >> i apologize. that's not a nonsec nonnon sequ. >> i think she knows how to get in the paper. she represents a segment of the republican party that they should be ashamed of. and that they're going to have to deal with at some point. like she cannot be someone who is the future of the gop, let's face it. this is the kind of thinking that alienated so many lahtino vo
opened the doors for civil rights, inspired a generation, and literally took us to the moon. get a copy of "jack kennedy, elusive hero." it makes a fabulous, affordable gift for people who share your ideals. it's a paperback, it's cheaper. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to
things. it's about a young leader who opened the doors for civil rights, inspired a generation, and literally took us to the moon. get a copy of "jack kennedy, elusive hero." it makes a fabulous, affordable gift for people who share your ideals. it's a paperback, it's cheaper. we'll be right back. +9@> >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to take them to a win. back in the 1950s the moderate wing of the republican party was coming off defeat until general dwight d. eisenhower came in creating what would later be called eisenhower republicans, a group that seems near extinction. evans thomas is author of a new book that is getting great reviews. and david eisenhower, for whom camp david was named, is the grandson of ike. >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to get them to win. back in the 1950s, the and by a landslide in 1956. >> your thoughts about his legacy then
believe it's rights for everyone, this is a civil right for me. i went to two weddings this summer, a same-sex couple and a heterosexual couple and they were equally beautiful and lovely. all i kent skept saying is why would anyone want to deeye nigh this to any human being. >> i agree. why? what could we -- how could we possibly be threatening other people who want to marry other people? it's just -- it's just not right. >> well, guys, as i said, ain't love grand. i hope you're together for a million years. >> thank you, don. >> thank you. >>> what does your smartphone say about you according to a new study? the phone you use could say a lot about your maturity and your dating life. i'll explain next. 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. dating life
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
was known for being one of the first supporters of civil rights. he died in beaumont after a sudden illness. he was widely known for this photograph standing behind president johnson as he's being sworn in aboard air force one in 1963. brooks was also in the dallas motorcade when jfk was shot. >>> president obama's chief speechwriter might be leaving. "the washington post" reports john favro is not clear if he'll write the president's inaugural address first. >>> where is jan brewer? she notified her office she'd be gone for a week but didn't say where she'd be going. her staff says it is official business. >>> two big milestones for women, congressman nita lowie will be the ranking democrat, making her the highest in that ki committee's history and elizabeth warren is expected to be named to the senate banking committee. according to the "wall street journal" it could be a signal from the democrats to wall street to watch out. >>> we're barely out of the november 2012 elections and there's talk what big names you could see in the ballot box ahead. richard lui is here with that. >> that's t
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
's most bright, great jazz musicians, he was also a fighter for civil rights and justice. bill cosby reflects on his extraordinary life next. the holidays are here and we're here with cyreeta talking about the walmart low price guarantee. that's your receipt from another store? it is! let's put it to the test. alright! that's walmart's everyday low price. get out! ok, but i'm taking these! ready? yes. there you have it! that much? that's the walmart low price guarantee. see for yourself. bring in your last receipt and see how much you can save. be ready. with the season's tastiest brands. like nestle toll house morsels. bake the very best this season. walmart has everything you need to be ready for holiday hosting. with our low price guarantee backed by ad match. walmart. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you
of civilization. it's stored right here. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. >> jennifer: injureyou're back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. we have movies that matter series. i'll tell but a movie that is causing a buzz. it's called "chasing ice"." >> i never imagined you could sees glaciers disappearing in such a short time. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years. shoot every hour as long as it was daylight to show you how the landlandscape was changing. >> the landscape is gone and it may never be seen again in the history of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was ab
was not willing. what she is doing and i will say this because it needs to be said, i came out of the civil right movement and i was involved in the election of the first black mayors across america, chicago, philadelphia, atlanta, a lost places. for the congressional democrats to go out there and to attack her as racist and an attack on women, when are we going to reach a place in politics when where you lie, which she did, and you screw up, you are held accountable regardless of race and gender. this is, this victimization stuff is backfiring i am afraid and it is all the cards she think she has and she is running the meeting and was arrogant. >> it comes from the top down, since the president was re-elected, we saw the thing we talked about in the first segment with him trying to take the power away to raise the debt debt. that is unbelievable. and i think he things he can have anyone he wants and stick it down the senator's throats. >>gregg: do you think he will nominate her? >> i don't think he can. he will have to go of necessity, to john kerry who the republicans will confirm in a second a
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
more moderate. i would say that you were 100% right. there is a civil war going on among the leadership. remember, the leader used to brag about they didn't have leaders and what happened was they were hijacked by big money. that's what happened to the tea party. they are not the same tea party that you and i -- remember in that march when we walked past the demonstration on the lincoln memorial? that's not the same tea party that evolved. >> former congressman joe perriola and joe madison, thanks for coming on tonight. >> thanks. >>> protests pepper sprayed in michigan. the president just responded. big story tonight. >>> and a memo to the gop, when you've lost ann coulter on taxes, you know you're in trouble. stay with us. >>> we've told you how papa john's ceo is eating his words after criticizing the health care law. but he's not the only one. darden's restaurant which owns olive garden and red lobster and other chains says it will cut full-time hours so they wouldn't have to give them what was health insurance. they want service treated right and darden's anti-health care crab fest
of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was about computer modeling, which at the time was relatively primitive. i was wrong about that. the real story was about--the real evidence had-held in the ice cores up to antarctica to to arctic. once i took time to stop and understand the empirical evosed to my my misconceptions. i started this in the late 90s but it wasn't until 2005 when the ice work started get going that i got locked into the trajectory that became the movie and ice survey. >> jennifer: you're in position to provide other i am empirical evidence, which is what your film is about. what is happening with the film? do you think it's ch
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